Working smart: be active after eating

Tidying up

So here’s my work-smart tip of the day for y’all students. But before I share it, remember: in the hyper-competitive world of today, working hard is nothing special anymore. It’s working smart that will make the difference.

This tip is really very simple. You know how you tend to feel sleepy after a meal, especially lunch? Many of us doze off after lunch or just become completely unproductive, for instance staring at the phone drowsily for two hours. Not smart!

What I advise you to do is to be physically active after a meal. No, not running or football or rope skipping. But just doing some physical chores, for instance washing dishes and walking the dog; tidying up your room or your file; or doing your grocery shopping. This will help regulate blood sugar and not only reduce the drowsiness that comes from the surge in blood sugar followed by the crash, it will also lower the risk of diabetes. You can also lessen the drowsiness by eating natural, whole-grain foods (such as brown rice and whole-grain bread) rather than refined carbohydrates.

I find that after eating is the best time to do all the mundane chores as I have a surplus of energy from the carbohydrates that I just consumed. Not only do I get the annoying chores out of the way, I also reduce my post-meal sleepiness – which unlocks more energy for me to do other, non-physical work thereafter such as studying and writing.

A productive day is a cause for much satisfaction – it is a day well lived. May we all work smarter.

………

Website owner Steven Ooi, a First Class Honours grad from the National University of Singapore, retired from a distinguished 14-year career as a GP and English tutor in 2016. He continues to blog on issues of concern to General Paper and student life.

To view tutors recommended by him, click here.

GP model essays here.

GP or English tutors (including part-timers) keen to be listed on this website (consistently ranked top 10 on Google for GP tutor/ tuition searches) as a Recommended Tutor, please email stevenooi18 @ yahoo.com (remove the spaces). Tutors in other subjects interested in having links to their website are also welcome to contact him.

Advertisements
Posted in Advice for teenagers, General academic advice, Students Working Smart | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Then they came for Peppa Pig

Peppa Pig

AP photo

By Josh Rogin
Columnist, The Washington Post

May 3, 2018

Most Americans have never heard of Peppa Pig, the cartoon star of a British television show for preschoolers, which Chinese censors started purging from Internet apps and Chinese social media over the past week. Americans may not be bothered that an animated pig was deemed subversive by China’s state media and a bad influence on China’s youth. But we should be.

That China would suppress Peppa at all shows the government’s insecurity about any cultural phenomenon it can’t control. But for foreigners, it may seem harmless. Last year, many reacted with bemusement when China began censoring Winnie the Pooh, partly out of concern he looks like Chinese President Xi Jinping. (Personally, I don’t see the resemblance.)

China’s internal Internet censorship regime is part of its greater effort to control the behavior of its citizens. Combined with blanket surveillance, intrusive monitoring and a new Orwellian social credit score system, the Chinese Communist Party links loyalty to success in all aspects of Chinese life. But aside from altruistic belief in universal human rights, why should Americans care?

Read more here.

……….

Website owner Steven Ooi, a First Class Honours grad from NUS, retired from a distinguished 14-year career as an English and GP tutor in 2016. He continues to blog on issues of concern to GP and student life.

To view tutors recommended by him, click here.

GP model essays here.

English or GP tutors keen to be listed on this website (consistently ranked top 10-15 on Google) as a Recommended Tutor, please email stevenooi18 @ yahoo.com (remove the spaces). Tutors in other subjects interested in having links to their website are also welcome to contact him.

Posted in Recommended Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A difficult topic, but a moral responsibility for parents

Dear parents,

Many of us don’t talk to our kids about sex because we’re afraid that it will encourage them to experiment. Actually studies show the opposite – adolescents who are the best informed about sexuality are the most likely to postpone sex and avoid risky behaviour. So talk to your kids about sexuality and do not shy away from sharing your values. Explain your beliefs and your reasons for them, without forcing them onto your child (because we all know what happens when you try to force a teenager to take your point of view). Be an askable parent – someone whom your child can have a safe, non-judgemental, open conversation with about sex and sexuality.

Here are a few pictures from a wonderful book by Filipina college lecturer and development worker Pammy Godoy, who got pregnant at 17 and rose above her mistakes to raise awareness of sexuality education around the country. Please share this article with your teenage children.

Website owner Steven Ooi, a First Class Honours grad from NUS, retired from a distinguished 14-year career as an English and GP tutor in 2016. He continues to blog on issues of concern to GP and student life.

To view tutors recommended by him, click here.

GP model essays here.

English or GP tutors keen to be listed on this website (consistently ranked top 10-15 on Google) as a Recommended Tutor, please email stevenooi18 @ yahoo.com (remove the spaces). Tutors in other subjects interested in having links to their website are also welcome to contact him.

Posted in Random thoughts of a GP tutor | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

H2 Economics vs General Paper: and why I’m taking the H2 Economics examination in 2018 — Mr Seah (dotcom!)

[W]hy do we study perfect markets, where firms are price takers? One reason is that they provide a useful approximation to the real world and give us many insights into how a market economy works. [. . .] Another is that perfect markets provide an ideal against which to compare the real world, since in […]

via H2 Economics vs General Paper: and why I’m taking the H2 Economics examination in 2018 — Mr Seah (dotcom!)

The above is a wonderful article by my friend and fellow GP tutor Kevin Seah. A must-read for all students taking both General Paper and H2 Economics in JC.

…….

Website owner Steven Ooi, a First Class Honours grad from NUS, retired from a distinguished 14-year career as an English and GP tutor in 2016. He continues to blog on issues of concern to GP and student life.

To view tutors recommended by him, click here.

GP model essays here.

English or GP tutors keen to be listed on this website (consistently ranked top 10 on Google) as a Recommended Tutor, please email stevenooi18 @ yahoo.com (remove the spaces). Tutors in other subjects interested in having links to their website are also welcome to contact him.

Posted in Advice on GP | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

SOMEONE TELL TRUMP THE TRADE WAR IS OVER. CHINA WON

Chicken feet

SCMP file photo.

BY KEITH B. RICHBURG

South China Morning Post

Nine years ago it was car tyres followed by chicken feet. Now it’s washing machines and solar panels followed by sorghum. Aluminium and steel may soon be tossed in the mix.

The familiar trade skirmishes between the United States and China usually end with a whimper. But American presidents have traditionally been like the proverbial cartoon character who gets dropped off a cliff, run over with a steam roller and blown up with dynamite; he gets up, arches an angry eyebrow and declares: “Next time, I’m going to get really mad!”

 

Is the “next time” finally here in the US versus China trade dispute? Is President Donald Trump about to get really mad and launch new trade actions against China? Will the administration really start rejecting more Chinese commercial deals in the US on national security grounds? And will Beijing retaliate with an all out global trade war? Don’t count on it.

For all the huffing and puffing, it’s good first to remember that we’ve actually been here before.

Read more here.

……..

Website owner Steven Ooi, a First Class Honours grad from NUS, retired from a distinguished 14-year career as an English and GP tutor in 2016. He continues to blog on issues of concern to GP and student life.

To view tutors recommended by him, click here.

GP model essays here.

English or GP tutors keen to be listed on this website (consistently ranked top 10 on Google) as a Recommended Tutor, please email stevenooi18 @ yahoo.com (remove the spaces). Tutors in other subjects interested in having links to their website are also welcome to contact him.

Posted in Recommended Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Keeping Singapore’s economy dynamic despite nation’s demographic challenges

Sg foreign workforce

This TODAY file photo highlights Singapore’s tremendous dependence on foreign manpower

Some have advocated for zero net immigration and no increase in share of foreign workers in the workforce, while others argue that it is necessary to expand the labour force here to sustain economic growth. Yet, Singapore can achieve only two out of these three objectives and must make balanced choices in addressing this demographic trilemma, said managing director of the Monetary Authority of Singapore Ravi Menon. Speaking at the IPS Singapore Perspectives forum on Monday (Jan 22), Mr Menon added that Singapore’s demography alone does not dictate its destiny, as he spelt out how the nation can sustain its economic dynamism in the face of demographic change. Below is an edited excerpt of Mr Menon’s speech.

I will focus my presentation on the economic implications of demographic change: what it means for economic growth and economic dynamism. The two are different.

My presentation will centre around two broad themes.

First, I will describe our demographic trilemma – the constraints and the choices we need to make.

Second, I would like to argue that demographics is not destiny – why economic dynamism is not a numbers game and how we can remain dynamic amidst this demographic challenge.

Let’s start with the total fertility rate, or TFR.

By the way, we must be one of the few countries in the world where most people know what TFR stands for! It is indeed an existential issue for us.

The TFR is the starting point of all demographic analysis. Singapore has had a sustained decline in its TFR. Our TFR fell from around 1.8 in the 1980s (which is already below the replacement level of 2.1) to about 1.3 in the early 2000s. This has weighed heavily on resident population growth as seen from the relatively close correlation with the TFR.

Read more here.

………

Website owner Steven Ooi, a First Class Honours grad from the National University of Singapore, retired from a distinguished 14-year career as an English and GP tutor in 2016. He continues to blog on issues of concern to General Paper and student life.

To view tutors recommended by him, click here.

GP model essays here.

GP or English tutors (including part-timers) keen to be listed on this website (consistently ranked top 10 on Google for GP tutor/ tuition searches) as a Recommended Tutor, please email stevenooi18 @ yahoo.com (remove the spaces). Tutors in other subjects interested in having links to their website are also welcome to contact him.

Posted in Recommended Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Taking the Misery Out of Revision: the RAYL method

Keep Calm and Start Revising

So this is another technique discussed in Dr Richard Palmer’s splendid book, Studying for Success. He calls it Review As You Learn (RAYL) and promises that it will take the misery out of revision. I will try to explain the technique as concisely as possible; if you want a fuller account and more priceless tips, get the book!

Essentially, says Dr Palmer, most students look dreadful at the exam hall – “pasty and drained, with bloodshot eyes and trembling hands” – and why? Because they’ve had to cram a year’s work or more into two months. The problem is a lack of long-term memory (LTM) of what you have learned in school. When exams draw near, you dig up your old materials and find that you have to do much more than just revise (the re-perusal of familiar material) – you need to learn from scratch because a lot of the stuff is no longer familiar to you.

RAYL3

So the secret is to Review As You Learn, “an immensely important principle” according to Dr Palmer. A key premise of this is:

The likelihood of remembering something is in direct proportion to the number of times it is used or studied.

This is why you probably find it quite easy to remember your ID number, your phone number or the lyrics to an overplayed song. Thus, the key to transferring content from short-term to long-term memory is repetition: a constant and regular review of past work. Figure 3.4 shows a suggested series of intervals at which to revisit past material. By your sixth return to the content, it should be firmly lodged in your LTM.

RAYL1

Dr Palmer stresses that this should not take much time: as little as ten minutes a day. Provided you concentrate properly for those ten minutes, such review can be done at the end of an evening’s work or at any fallow time.

It is exemplary time management. Invest these little bits of time on a consistent basis, and when it’s time to revise for exams again you will find it so much more comfortable. All or most of the material will look familiar to you, and you can quickly recap and reinforce. Moreover, you would have had months for it to ferment and synthesize in your mind. Chances are your understanding and appreciation of the material would have grown, and you would have developed deeper insight into it.

Happy Revision!

………

Website owner Steven Ooi, a First Class Honours grad from the National University of Singapore, retired from a distinguished 14-year career as an English and GP tutor in 2016. He continues to blog on issues of concern to GP and student life.

To view tutors recommended by him, click here.

GP sample essays here.

English or GP tutors keen to be listed on this website (consistently ranked top 10-15 on Google) as a Recommended Tutor, please email stevenooi18 @ yahoo.com (remove the spaces). Tutors in other subjects interested in having links to their website are also welcome to contact him.

 

Posted in General academic advice | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment